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William Henry Warder

Male 1821 - 1894  (73 years)


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  • Name William Henry Warder 
    Born 20 Aug 1821  Mason, Kentucky, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 21 Oct 1894  Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3594  The Berry - Miller Family Tree
    Last Modified 28 Aug 2018 

    Father Walter Fairfax Warder,   b. 13 Dec 1787, Fauquier, Virginia, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Apr 1836, Missouri, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Mother Mary Polly Maddox,   b. 27 Dec 1785, Barren, Kentucky, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Oct 1829, Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years) 
    Married 27 Dec 1808  Barren, Kentucky, United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1808Marriage-PollyMaddox-WalterWarder.jpg
    1808Marriage-PollyMaddox-WalterWarder.jpg
    1808 Marriage record for Polly Maddox and Walter Warder.
    Family ID F123  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 20 Aug 1821 - Mason, Kentucky, United States of America Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 21 Oct 1894 - Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States of America Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 
    • Walter Warder, A History and Genealogy of the Warder family of Virginia, Kentucky and Illinois (1934).

      SKETCH OF WILLIAM H. WARDER OF CHICAGO
      "The Illinois branch of the Warder Family is descended from the two brothers, Joseph and William H. Warder, both sons of Rev. Walter Warder, who emigrated from Mason Co., KY about the middle of the eighteenth century. William H. Warder, the younger of the two, was born in Maysville, Mason Co., KY, Aug. 29, 1831. He married (1) Cordelia Green Artus, daughter of James Artus, a prominent citizen of Maysville a veteran of the War of 1812. They moved to Illinois about 1845 and settled in Chicago, at that time a small but rapidly growing town. A number of emigrants from northern Kentucky arrived in Chicago about the same time, among them Judge Lambert Tree and Mr. Honore, the father of Mrs. Potter Palmer.

      William H. Warder at once engaged in the business of real estate investments and acquired title to much real property which owing to the collapse of the boom proved to have been an unfortunate speculation. Afterward he became associated with Mr. Honore as his confidential agent and adviser in real estate matters for a number of years. Mr. Warder was an expert in his line and one was better acquainted with the growth and development of Chicago before the great fire.
      He was drawn into the gold rush to California in 1849 but remained but a short time. Later on having accumulated some capital he returned to California [Chicago?] to promote a large land reclamation scheme which proved unsuccessful.
      He was a handsome intellectual man of pleasing personality, fine address and made many friends wherever he went.

      After the death of his first wife he married Mary Johnston [Johnson], a graduate of Mount Holyoke, a refined and cultivated lady. She was the daughter of Captain Seth Johnston [Johnson] and was born in Fort Hamilton where her father had been sent to command the garrison after the massacre.

      An interesting episode in the life of William H. Warder occurred during the Civil War. A group of prominent capitalists and business men of Chicago and elsewhere had conceived the idea of effecting an arrangement between the North and the South for a trade exchange between the two governments whereby the North could send food products to the South of which it was then in sore need in exchange for cotton of which the North was lamentably short.

      With remarkable shrewdness and diplomacy, William H. Warder made his way through the military lines of both the Union and Confederate armies, and succeeded in obtaining personal interviews with both President Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. He claimed that he received courteous reception and respectful hearing from both of these great men, but they regarded the scheme as chimerical and declined to seriously consider it. He was a dreamer of dreams, but with his persuasive address, his intellectual gifts and business initiative, under more favorable circumstances, he might have carried through to success enterprises of great size and moment. He died at his home in Oak Park at the age of seventy-three.

      He early caught the Chicago spirit, and always predicted the ultimate wealth and greatness of Chicago. Whether riding on the top wave of success or plunged in the depth of depression he was always cheerful and optimistic, seeing with his visionary outlook only the future glory and supremacy that was in the future to be Chicago. To such citizens Chicago in indebted for the realization of the ambitious dreams of her early days.